Ospreys, Christmas, New Year’s Day: Things you can count on every year!

PHILADELPHIA, TENN., August 1, 2017 – Every year the same thing happens, Christmas comes on December 25th, New Year’s Day is January 1st and Ospreys return to their previous nesting sites. Those nests are built on utility structures, towers, bridges and other sites that are dangerous to not only the birds and their young, but also to homes, businesses and progress.

Every year, the Osprey population continues to grow due to effective conservation efforts. The young Ospreys leave the nest in their first year only to come back when mature to find their own nesting platforms. With Ospreys being very territorial, the younger birds are forced to find other nesting sites and will seek out a honeymoon suite of their own, and utility structures look like a good place to be.

How do you stop them from nesting where you don’t want them?

The most effective way to convince the Ospreys to move on to man-made or natural nesting sites is to clear the nests off structures in the late summer and fall after the fledglings leave the nest and introduce a deterrent at that time. If done properly, when the Ospreys return in the spring, they will be forced to find a safer nesting site.

The worst thing to do, is to do nothing and before you know it, the Ospreys are back and nesting. Once they lay eggs, under the law, you will be unable to move the nest until all Ospreys vacate the nest.

The “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent is a device that when properly installed will force the Ospreys to find a new nesting site. Below you will see the proper process used when installing the “OFF”-Sprey and it will work on more than just utility poles. It can be installed on bridges, towers, flat-top buildings, and just about any type of structure. When ordering, it is best to get the dimensions of the structure and provide photos so that a device can be modified to fit your application.

For more information, visit www.offsprey.com to view our products and contact us to place an order.

Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/off.sprey.deterrent/ and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/OffSprey

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“OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent Recieves Patent

PHILADELPHIA, TENN., June 21, 2017 – The “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent was granted the Patent Number 9,668,468 by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Michael L. Nichols Sr., inventor of the “Off”-Sprey applied for the patent on October 1, 2013 and was approved on June 6, 2017.

The background on the device listed with the patent office states, “Many people enjoy the presence of birds on their property as evidence by the abundance of bird feeders and birdbaths that can be seen in yards throughout the country. But even bird lovers must admit that when birds roost near and on utility poles, disaster is often the end result. Due to the close proximity to energized electrical components, nests often make contact with the components leading to short circuits. This causes blackouts to possibly wide areas of homes and businesses, resulting in financial loss, and perhaps physical damage. Even if power failures do not occur, large birds such as eagles and ospreys can be severely injured, or even killed should they themselves come in contact with live electrical components. Accordingly, there exists a need for a means by which large birds can be prevented from roosting and a nesting on or near utility poles. The development of the present invention fulfills this need.”

Necessity is the mother of invention has never been a truer statement.

“The need for a device to protect both personal, public, and utility property and the wellbeing of raptor populations is the main reason for the design and development of the “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent,” Mike Nichols, said. “As humans have encroached on the natural habitat of the raptors, the birds have been exposed to hazards that do not exist in nature. Many attempts to protect property and raptors by other means often fell well short of the needed results.”

The “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent offers an inexpensive, relatively easy and most importantly simple solution to solve the problems created with human and raptor conflicts.

“The future success of these raptor populations and the continued reliability of utility services and the protection of personal property are achieved with the use of this protective device,” Nichols said.

Visit www.offsprey.com to view our products and contact us to place an order.

Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/off.sprey.deterrent/ and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/OffSprey

 

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* Official Press Release: offsprey-patent

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OSPREY DETERRENTS, COMPLICATED DOESN’T MAKE IT BETTER

With Ospreys, simple works better.

LOUDON, TENN., May 21, 2017– Often when people are looking for answers on how to solve a problem, they often look at how much work goes into the solution and overlook that a simple application works better. We have written in the past about what deters and what doesn’t (http://www.offsprey.com/2016/04/osprey-deterrents-what-deters-and-what-doesnt/) and have shown that you can install the “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent in under 15 minutes (on a utility pole, other applications vary in time). But what you don’t know is, with the “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent’s simple design, it will out-perform more complicated (and expensive) devices.

The “OFF”-Sprey device works on the simple premise that Ospreys are relatively claustrophobic and are very protective of their flight feathers and will not fly into tight spaces. They hover over the structure and drop limbs, sticks and other debris to make their nests on top of the structures and then land to arrange them into their nest. With the “OFF”-Sprey, they first, can’t get close enough to make a precise drop, and the debris is deflected by the deterrent. Second, the device is placed in such a way that the birds can’t land and arrange any debris that might have landed on the structure. As the Osprey continues to drop debris and can’t build their nests, they get increasingly frustrated and eventually give up on that particular site and move on to another site, whether it be a manmade nesting platform or a natural nesting site.

With the “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent being simplistic in design and easy to install, it is also easy to dismantle for workers to get in and work on the structure and then reinstalled when finished. Times and size will often vary, depending on the structure being protected, as you can see by the different designs shown below. You can also see all of our designs by visiting http://www.offsprey.com/products/.

Here is a good video of a ‪Osprey trying to build a nest on a utility pole that has the “OFF”-Sprey installed (https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=XunCV_3-Y5g)

 

Visit the “OFF”- Sprey Raptor Deterrent (www.offsprey.com), FaceBook page (www.facebook.com/off.sprey.deterrent)  Twitter (www.twitter.com/OffSprey)  or on our YouTube Channel (www.youtube.com/channel/UC-oJdoiEk4fCombT6xlGNqA ) .

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 For more information or to place an order for The “OFF” – Sprey Raptor Deterrent, contact Power Supply Company LLC (423)624-7330 www.offsprey.com

* The “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent is patented and any configuration is protected under the U.S. Patent laws and any unauthorized use or attempts to copy will be considered a violation and will be dealt with accordingly.

Official Press Release: offsprey-simple

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Products to Protect Ospreys and Your Structures

Check out our Products designed to protect the Osprey and your structures. New modification added to protect towers. http://www.offsprey.com/products/

 

 

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“OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent Protects More Than Utilities Now:

It can also be modified for residential use.

Originally designed for utility structures, the “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent has been and can be modified for various situations where Ospreys nesting has become a problem. By contacting us at offsprey2015@gmail.com and providing photos and specifications, modifications to the device can be made to fit your needs. Whether it be a chimney, boathouse or some other residential structure, we will work to prevent the Ospreys from nesting where they don’t belong.

 

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Ospreys are Back and Ready to Nest. Help Protect Them!

Ospreys are making their way back to their spring nesting areas. Help prevent them from injury or death by removing the nests early and putting up an “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent. Visit us at www.offsprey.com

#Osprey #OspreyNests #Utilities #PoleFires#ElectricCompanies #NestingDeterrent 

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Osprey Timeline: When do You Remove Nests and Install the “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent

Here is a handy guide to help you plan your Osprey Deterrent efforts. The best time to install your “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent is before they return from migration between September and February. Remember, if you have nests that are occupied with either eggs or fledglings, you can NOT disturb them without going through your local or state wildlife agency. If you break eggs, injure or kill the young Ospreys, you can be fined through the U.S. Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Since the Ospreys migrate back to the same nesting spots year after year, once they leave the nest, or if you see them beginning to build the nests you should install your “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent.

See this post on Utility Products’ website

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THE BIRDS ARE GONE!! But Should Not Be Forgotten…

YEA! The Ospreys have left to migrate to their winter habitat. This begins the approximately 6-month period that most utilities can take a breath and not have to worry about the disruption of service due to their nesting habits. Most focus shifts to more seasonal concerns regarding winter weather, possible storms, and other issues that influence the utilities. You can be sure though that they will be back!   Sure, we know that weather can’t be controlled and we know that there will be issues resulting from it in the time coming soon. We know that holidays will be observed and seasons will change as it happens every year. Weather can’t be predicted or controlled and we will endure the seasonal issues both good and bad.

On the other hand, Ospreys are creatures of habit and will return and set up
housekeeping to rear new offspring in the Spring. They will migrate to the same locatioOsprey-10-7-13 003n barring any unforeseen incident. Chances are that if you had a nest last year then the same two Osprey will return and continue to build on the same nesting site and rear a new hatch of fledglings and then the problems will start all over again. Oh, by the way, to add to the problem those Osprey that are now turning two years old and have spent the
winters since birth at the wintering areas will be returning looking for a place to set up their own nests to raise their offspring.

We can’t control weather, time, or seasons, but we can have an effect on the interruptions og3-tnlcaused by the Osprey’s nesting habits. It is as simple as finding these abandoned nests, removing it, and installing the “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent  in its place.
There are several designs of the device that allow for many types of structures to be protected. We can make modifications to the device to meet your special needs and circumstances.

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to control the interruptions caused by the Ospreys? At least, this is something that can be done so we have one less problem when Spring gets here.

For more information go to our Contact page.

 

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What do I do after the osprey season? Are you being proactive or reactive?

If Ospreys nest on a utility structure, bridge, ball field lights or in a place that they should not be, the first thing to do is to try and prevent them from getting the nest set.  But what happens if you don’t find them in time and they begin to lay eggs? Laws and requirements are different from state to state and country to country. The first thing to do, is to contact your local conservation officer or game management department and let them know. If there is a way to move it without breaking eggs or injuring fledglings the officer will let you know and supervise the effort. If you are successful in moving it, then you must think ahead to next year’s nesting season and place a deterrent on top to prevent them from being able to build a nest on the same structure again.

The one thing that you can be absolutely sure of, after a successful nesting season, is that they will return the next year to the same location barring any unforeseen tragedy to the nesting pair. They will continue to add to the size of the nest year after year.Debris from an Osprey attempting to build a nest. This increased nest size creates more overhang thus coming closer to energized equipment and in turn increasing the possibility of hazards to the Osprey or the utility structure that they have chosen. The Osprey can be killed by electrocution, injured by fire, and their debris can pose any number of potential problems if it falls from their chosen structure onto cars, roads, or even people.

If you are not able to remove the nest, then you must keep an eye on the nest until the fledglings leave and then remove it and replace with a deterrent to prevent any rebuilding. The problem most utilities have is that once they remove the nest they are not thinking about next year’s season until the season actually begins and then it becomes a game of chess with the Osprey. You take a nest down one day and before the tail lights of the utility truck are out of sight the birds are back building. Off-Sprey-2013By the next day they have successfully reconstructed the base of the nest then continuing to add debris during the coming days. This is especially true with the older, more mature Ospreys who have been building nests on that same particular structure year after year. Once they have chosen a nesting site, they are set in their ways and will battle with you day after day. It is a vicious cycle; the birds need to follow natures nesting urges and the utility needs to protect their structures and reliability of the electric system. Neither of these needs is wrong, but something must be done to modify the birds’ selective process. They don’t know that it is for their own safety that humans are somewhat interfering.

The key to all of this is, making sure that when you remove a nest, you replace it with “OFF”-Sprey Raptor Deterrent. The great thing about this device is, that it is very durable to wind and weather, and it allows utility workers to be able to see the entire structure without covering any of the working components. If the utility structure needs any work done to it, it is easily removed (by loosening a couple screws) so that the work can be done and when complete can be set back in place to continue protecting the structure.

What this all comes down to, is that Ospreys will come back to the same nesting site year after year and it is up to the utility company and those who have volunteers watching out for the birds to keep an eye out. If you put the deterrent up in the summer after they leave the nest, then you will not have to rush to try and keep them off when the nesting season starts back up the next year. Also, often times these nests are in areas that are not easily accessible year round.  Weather and terrain can become a factor when trying to address the problem “when the building time is here” for the Osprey to nest. This proactive measure will allow you to have the luxury of time for most of the summer to make the needed modifications, instead of the short window at the end of winter and the beginning of spring.Ad-8-2016

Call Power Supply Company, LLC at (423)624-7330 or visit us at www.offsprey.com. facebook.com/off.sprey.deterrent , twitter.com/OffSprey or email us at off-sprey@hotmail.com

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